Thursday, January 04, 2007

Are We The Only People In America Who Still Try To Pee Standing Up In Bus Bathrooms? Or For That Matter, Who Take The Bus?

We’re sorry we haven’t posted today, but we spent seven hours today on the Greyhound from the North Country to New York. Of course we brought our flask, which resulted in exactly the effect we wanted – arriving in our home city, slightly drunk, at sunset. In fact, as we type, we are on our laptop passing that random high net beside I-95 in the Bronx, which is either a driving range or a batting cage. We’d probably be able to tell if we cared about sports.

It’s a funny thing, returning to New York, if you’re not from here. We’ve lived in this city for nearly four years, but we will never get over the cheesy small-town excitement that comes with seeing the New York skyline as it slips into the view from the train, bus, or car.

When we were living in Spain, everyone we met was fascinated that we lived in New York. They had a million questions. “Have you met Robert De Niro?” they would ask. “Were you there when the towers fell?” “It must seem normal for you,” they’d say. But it doesn’t.

Right now the New York skyline is burning with the orange of the setting sun. We just looked back on the bus, and everyone is gaping out of the window toward the island of Manhattan. Every time we go through this, it’s the same. We can hardly believe it - we’re home.

6 comments:

aatom said...

very nice. captures the return home to the city perfectly. except i have that view from my bedroom every night. Jersey isn't so bad, when you have that.

Tristan said...

I like how you get all sentimental when you are wasted.

t.todd said...

hey bigmouth babydoll lovemuffin, welcome home. from one of your newest fans in the most magical city on the other coast. we're glad you're back . . .

Bald Knob said...

Welcome home brother. Good to have you back.

travellingstatic said...

haha, the bus.

how cute!

Michael S. said...

Cheesy you say. I've lived in New York for three fourths of my life, and I still gasp when I see it whether from Brooklyn heading for the tunnel, or the L.I.Expressway driving back into the city as the sun sets. I especially loved leaving the pre-dawn city as I was headed north to go fishing upstate in Brewster, and saw the still gray towers, lights on, as the sky began to light up. People liked to dis them, but to me they were alive.

This is a town you never get over; there are so many parts and corners to discover, and all different it makes Paris look like a has-been. And if you ever do get jaded by this, you're probably dead.